Saturday, August 13, 2022

 Greetings to all would-be cruisers! With heavy hearts, we offer our beautiful Mr Mac for sale. A Bruce Roberts Seamaster 45, this sloop-rigged sailboat is outfitted to be an outstanding liveaboard and/or cruise-ready boat. We've cruised her from Maine to Trinidad and Panama to Mexico, and she's equipped and ready to leave again tomorrow. See detailed information below. For sale info, contact Chris at chris@jaxbooks.com or Peter Hartley at peter.yachtsales@gmail.com or 727-642-3254.

 

 

45 Bruce Roberts Seamaster 45



  • Mr. Mac
  • Year: 1986
  • Current Price: US $124,900.00
  • Located in St Petersburg, FL
  • Hull Material: Fiberglass
  • Engine/Fuel Type: Diesel
  • PRICE REDUCED!!

    "Mr. Mac" is an extremely well outfitted cruising boat. Turn key is an understatement when describing the current state of this Bruce Roberts Seamaster 45. After several years of full time cruising, the owners are ready to move off the boat and allow someone to pick up where they left off. The boat has been meticulously maintained and upgraded and has very thorough documentation and descriptions of all work completed throughout the years. From tools, spare parts, as well as full safety gear there is not much the next owner will need to do before dropping the lines to head to any destination they can think of.

    New AC 16.000 BTU, 2022
    Bottom Job, 2021
    Mainsail, 2020
    Deck Painted, 2022

    Additional Specs, Equipment and Information:
    Builder/Designer
    Builder: Bruce Roberts
    Designer: Bruce Roberts
    Dimensions
    LOA: 45
    LWL:
    Beam: 13'2"
    Displacement: 34000
    Draft: 5'6"

    Bridge Clearance: 57
    Ballast: 8000
    Engines
    Engine(S): Yanmar
    Engine(S) HP: 55
    Engine Model: 2006 4JH4-E
    Hours: 5204
    Cruising Speed:
    Max Speed:
    Tankage
    Fuel: 90
    Water: 300
    Holding: 6

    Accommodations
    Starting in the bow there is a full head that provides access to the anchor locker. Moving aft there is a berth to port with storage and lockers to starboard. Continuing aft is the salon with long settees on either side that can be used as berths. Upper and lower Alpine stereo speakers provide all-around sound. The engine room access is behind removable companionway steps. Walkways on either side of the companionway lead aft. Port side is the galley with a large double SS sink as well as large fridge and freezer. To starboard is another berth that is currently used as a work bench with well organized tools and spare parts. Both walkways lead aft to the master stateroom wtih ensuite head.

    Master Cabin Aft -
    Queen size berth w/custom mattress, reading light
    Shelf on starboard w/cabinets beneath
    Under berth storage
    Ensuite head w/manual Jabsco toilet
    ElectraSan waste treatment system
    Shower
    Teak grate on head floor
    SS sink w/upper and lower cabinets

    Passage Berth/Work Room -

    Pullman berth - tool storage/work bench
    Drawers below and cabinets above





    ALL PHOTOS>>>

    Galley & Plumbing

    Double SS sinks w/hot/cold faucet
    Hillerange propane 3-burner stove w/oven and broiler, solenoid cutoff for propane
    GE microwave

    Freezer w/holding plates - 12v and engine driven (compressor and Danfoss control unit, 2021
    Refrigerator w/12v air cooled cold plate, 2008





    Electronics

    ICOM IC-M59 VHF, main salon
    ICOM IC-M330 VHF, cockpit, 2020
    ICOM IC-M700-pro SSB/Ham w/tuner and aft-stay antenna, 2009
    Furuno GP-32 GPS,2007
    Northstar Explorer D310 depth, 2005

    Northstar Explorer W310 wind, 2010
    Simrad AP-24 autopilot, 2014, hyd ram rebuilt 2021,hyd pump motor 2020,compass 2017,separate Simrad WR10 remote 2015
    Kenwood KMR-D328BT marine CD/radio receiver w/bluetooth,USB, Sirius XM ready,Alpine speakers, 2015





    Electrical

    110v AC system , 2ea 30 amp circuits
    12v DC system
    2ea Kyocera 135watt solar panels - mounted on arch, controller 2008
    4ea 100watt solar panels - mounted on hard bimini,controller 2018
    Kiss wind generator (rebuilt 2021) mounted on arch w/Xantrex controller and heat sink
    Xantrex 1800watt inverter, 2005
    Tri-Metric battery monitor, 2007

    Iota shore-side battery charger, 2000
    4ea L-16 Primary batteries, 2020
    2ea 4D Secondary batteries, 2020
    2ea Windlass batteries, 2018
    Main engine start battery, 2021
    Shore power cables, 50' 30 amp
    All new electrical in mast, 2008





    Sails & Sail Handling

    Standing rigging replaced 2008
    SS bowsprit rebuilt 2020
    SS rod bobstays, 2008
    Mast steps and bosun's chair
    Eco Sails mainsail w/cover and lazy jacks, 2020

    110% roller furling genoa, 2015
    180% genoa
    5ea Enkes sheet winches
    2ea halyard winches
    Heavy weather staysail with cable luff
    Telescoping whisker pole

    Hull & Deck

    Modified full keel w/cutaway forefoot, integral lead ballast
    Hull peeled below waterline,reglassed w/vinyl-ester resin, then primed w/Milspec epoxy primer, 2015
    Deck cored end-grain balsa
    Bottom painted, Interlux Aqua, 2021
    Topsides painted w/Awlgrip, 2011
    Thru hulls replaced, 2015
    Deck painted w/Interlux polyurethane, 2022
    SS stanchions, new ss bases, 2015
    SS stern arch w/integral stern rail, 2008
    Double SS lifelines, 30", 2008
    8ea Bomar hatches
    12ea opening ports
    73# Rocna anchor on bow roller (2015) w/150' 5/16" chain(2020)
    EPIRB w/GPS,2015
    Viking 4 person life raft, hard container(2008), repacked 2015
    Life sling
    Flares/flare launcher
    Para-anchor w/300' rode
    6ea Type-II PFDs
    4ea fire extinguishers
    Automatic Halon fire extinguishers in engine room

    Lofran Tigres windlass,2013
    Rocna snubber gear
    45# Danforth w/100' chain and 100' rode
    Fortress aluminum anchor
    Saltwater deck wash
    SS propane grill
    SS folding swim ladder
    Foredeck awning, 2021
    9'6" Highfield Hypalon dinghy,2015
    9.8 Tohatsu 2 stroke, short shaft, 2011
    3 gal fuel tank w/hose
    5 gal spare fuel tank
    Dinghy anchor w/chain and rode

    Phifertex covered cushions
    Dodger w/SS hardware, Sunbrella canvas, roll up eisenglass center panel
    Custom Nidacore and fiberglass hard bimini w/tie loops for sun shade, 2016
    2ea Phifertex sun shades
    Ritchie compass
    Custom built SS binnacle w/NavPod housing - Furuno GP-32GPS,depth sounder, wind instrument
    Simrad AP-24 autopilot, hardmounted, w/separate Simrad WR10 autopilot remote
    Furuno 1715 24 mile range Radar w/mast mounted radome






     

    Sunday, April 14, 2019

    Creature Feature: Crabs Rule in Providencia





    Sign along the western road announcing the closure for crabs
    You might know that Anne is a crab geek, not surprising since she spent nearly twenty years doing crustacean research for the State of Florida. And Chris likes to eat crabs. So, we were intrigued by the signs we saw on Providencia regarding the black land crab Gecarcinus ruricola. Travelling in the Caribbean, you’ve probably seen the holes that these crabs occupy in forested areas, often far from the water, or wondered W.T.F? upon finding a crab claw high up a mountain. They’re also often found in the market or on the menu if you want a taste. The species is nocturnal, and their skittering about in the dark, clicking across a road or rustling through the undergrowth, can be unnerving if you don’t know what it is. Anyway, it’s precisely these wanderings that bring attention to the crab during mating season. Though terrestrial as adults, larval development occurs in the ocean. Adults migrate from the forest to the ocean to spawn, then back to the forest. Initial larval development occurs at sea, then megalopal-stage larvae (looking mostly like little crabs at this point) migrate back ashore and head to the forest. And these are not small migrations; the population on Providencia was estimated at three million. If a road lies between forest and ocean…well, you can imagine the mess. Consequently, from April 1 to July 31, a portion of the road that runs along the western side of Providencia is closed to all vehicles. Since the road around the island is a loop, this means a lot of detouring back around the eastern side of the island. Time-consuming, perhaps, but it’s done for the purpose of conserving the species, which is good thing. They show a film of the black land crab migration at the Lighthouse Café/Cinema/Art House, but we unfortunately didn’t make it. Fellow crab geeks can find detailed analyses of black land crab population biology and reproduction on Providencia and San Andrés in these articles from the Journal of Crustacean Biology. And if you want to feel a little squirmy, check out this video of migrating adult and larval red land crabs (related species) on Christmas Island – not the exact species as on Providencia, but related, and the same general idea.


    Crab information alongside the trail to the Peak

    Crab migration documentary at the Lighthouse

    The black land crab is even featured at a bus stop


    Wednesday, April 10, 2019

    A Scooter for a Day on Providencia

    Renting a scooter allowed us to reach some beautiful out-of-the-way spots

    So, we’d explored sections of Providencia by foot and by bus, but craved the freedom to explore farther afield and on our own time, so we rented a scooter (moto, in the local parlance) for the day. Scooters are the vehicle of choice on Providencia. They vastly outnumber cars, trucks, or vans, their small size no deterrent to multiple passengers. We’d often see whole families – mother, father, several children – balanced precariously (to us) atop the seat and handle bars, or people carrying things like bicycles held out to the side, or large containers on their laps. Once we even saw a woman blithely steering with one hand, an infant draped over her other arm. It all seemed so effortless. It’s not. Anne opted for a helmet, putting her in the tiny minority of riders (and she eventually took it off so as not to conk Chris on the head with it every time we changed speed). We headed out down the eastern road, stopping at Pash Beach, which had been badly eroded by the winter storms. Then we got to Bahia Aguadulce (Fresh Water Bay). Very cute and quaint with many small beachside hotels and restaurants – there’s even a Mr Mac posada! Next stop was Bahia Suroeste (Southwest Bay). Here, the long, sandy beach is dotted with little rustic restaurants where we had a delicious seafood lunch. Seafood is abundant and relatively inexpensive around Providencia – not surprising, given the location – with nary a sign of the usual ubiquitous Caribbean standard, fried chicken. Aboard the moto once again, we sought out what was reputed to be the most beautiful beach on the island – Machineel. After seeking and not finding, then asking directions of several people, we finally made our way there. Just lovely! We had a cold drink (non-alcoholic because…scooter) beneath the palms before heading back to town. The scooter made getting around convenient, but it was just a bit too nerve-wracking for us, so we decided to stick to the bus and our feet.

    Colorful hotels in Bahia Agua Dulce...
    ...and our very own Mr Mac cabanas!

    Beautiful Machineel Beach
    Waiting for lunch at a beachside restaurant

    Seafood was de rigueur at all the restaurants in Providencia, which makes sense for an island! Even better is that it was INEXPENSIVE seafood.

    A hillside view down to Southwest Beach